Indigenous peoples and globalization

Source: Survival
To mark the UN Day of Indigenous People, Survival has released the report "Serious Damage: Tribal peoples and large dams" highlighting the devastating impact on tribal people of a massive boom in dam-building for hydropower. Drawing on examples from Asia, Africa and the Americas, Survival’s report exposes the untold cost of obtaining ‘green’ electricity. [see more]
Source: Indigenous Peoples and Globalization Program - Forum on Globalization

Indigenous peoples are on the cusp of the crisis in sustainable development. Their communities are concrete examples of sustainable societies, historically evolved in diverse ecosystems. Today, they face the challenges of extinction or survival and renewal in a globalized world. The impact of globalization is strongest on these populations perhaps more than any other because these communities have no voice and are therefore easily swept aside by the invisible hand of the market and its proponents. Globalization is not merely a question of marginalization for indigenous peoples it is a multi-pronged attack on the very foundation of their existence and livelihoods, for example:

  • Indigenous people throughout the world sit on the "frontlines" of globalization's expansion; they occupy the last pristine places on earth, where resources are still abundant: forests, minerals, water, and genetic diversity. All are ferociously sought by global corporations, trying to push traditional societies off their lands.
  • New advances in technology, the reorientation toward export-led development, and the imperatives of pleasing global financial markets are all driving forces in the extermination of countless native communities which stand in their way.
  • Traditional sovereignty over hunting and gathering rights has been thrown into question as national governments bind themselves to new global economic treaties.
  • New trade and investment agreements, which are opening up previously inaccessible territory to industrial extraction of natural resources, has forced indigenous peoples to defend their homelands under an invasion of unprecedented rate and scale: Big dams, mines, pipelines, roads, energy developments, military intrusions all threaten native lands.
  • Global rules on the patenting of genetic resources via the WTO has made possible the privatization of indigenous peoplesí genomes, the biological diversity upon which they depend, and the very knowledge of how that biodiversity might be used commercially.
  • National governments making decisions on export development strategies or international trade and investment rules do not consult native communities.
    The reality remains that without rapid action, these native communities may be wiped out, taking with them vast indigenous knowledge, rich culture and traditions, and any hope of preserving the natural world, and a simpler, more holistic way of life for future generations.

The reality remains that without rapid action, these native communities may be wiped out, taking with them vast indigenous knowledge, rich culture and traditions, and any hope of preserving the natural world, and a simpler, more holistic way of life for future generations.
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UPDATES
Tuesday, August 10 2010
“Green” energy boom destroys tribes
(Source: Survival)
Tuesday, June 09 2009
Blood at the blockade: Peru’s indigenous uprising
(Source: Choike Blog)
Tuesday, December 09 2008
Guide on Climate Change & Indigenous Peoples
(Source: Tebtebba Foundation)

World Bank's policy

Indigenous Peoples, poverty and human development in Latin America: 1994-2004 (World Bank)

Broken promises (Rainforest Foundation)

Indigenous peoples and the World Bank (Bank Information Center)

Indigenous leaders say World Bank should take its own advice

World Bank’s revised policy on Indigenous Peoples

Map on globalization

Guide on Climate Change & Indigenous Peoples (Tebtebba Foundation)

A review of the situation of indigenous peoples 2007 (UNPO)

Progress can kill (Survival International)

Indigenous people and minorities: A global and historic assault (Irin News)

The Mapuche struggle today (Znet)

Colombian indigenous people protest loss of land and violation of rights (Third World Network)

Benetton seizes Mapuche´s lands (Indymedia and Choike)

Globalization: effects on indigenous peoples (International Forum on Globalization (IFG))

Permanent Forum

Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues

Africa

The rights of indigenous peoples in Africa (Pambazuka)

Asia

Stolen generations: Australia apologizes to indigenous population (ConectaSur)

UNHCHR Working Group on Indigenous Populations

Working group on indigenous populations (UNHCHR)

Report of the WG on its 21st session: Indigenous Peoples and Globalization

Extractive industries

“Green” energy boom destroys tribes (Survival)

Blood at the blockade: Peru’s indigenous uprising (Choike Blog)

Old habits die hard (Pambazuka)

Indigenous Peoples Organisations’ letter to the World Bank (Forest Peoples)

Issues of relevance to indigenous peoples and local communities in the final EIR report (Forest Peoples Programme)

Indigenous peoples' declaration on extractive industries (Forest People Programme)

Biodiversity conservation

The Global Environment Facility (GEF), Biodiversity Conservation and Indigenous Peoples (Forest Peoples Programme)

Latin America

Colombia: Indigenous self defense in times of war (Americas Program)

IDB and indigenous peoples (Indian Law)


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