Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues

Source: UN Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues
Although the state of the world's indigenous peoples is alarming, there is some cause for optimism. The international community increasingly recognizes indigenous peoples' human rights, most prominently evidenced by the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. Indigenous peoples themselves continue to organize for the promotion of their rights. January 2010. [see more]
"The Permanent Forum promises to give indigenous peoples a unique voice within the United Nations system, commensurate with the unique problems which many indigenous people still face, but also with the unique contribution they make to the human rights dialogue, at the local, national and international levels". Mary Robinson, Former United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights.

The Permanent Forum was created on 28 July 2000 by the Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC), upon recommendation of the Commission on Human Rights, with the purpose of discussing indigenous issues within the mandate of the ECOSOC relating to economic and social development, culture, environment, health and human rights.

The objectives established under the Forum's mandate include providing expert advice and proposing recommendations on indigenous issues to the ECOSOC, as well as to other programs, funds and agencies of the United Nations, and promoting the integration and coordination of indigenous activities within the UN system.

The establishment of the Forum is an achievement attained as a result of the mobilizations of generation after generation of indigenous peoples, dating back as far as 1924 with their appeal before the League of Nations, and spanning over decades of continuous joint efforts with the United Nations, starting in the 1970's. The Forum is formed by 16 independent experts acting in their personal capacity; eight of which have to be nominated by indigenous peoples and the other eight by governments. If they wish, governments may nominate indigenous experts, and some have done so. The Forum meets for ten-day sessions every year, in New York or Geneva, or in another venue chosen by its members.

The Forum's second session took place in the United Nations' New York headquarters from 12 to 23 May 2003. The theme for this second session was "Indigenous Children and Youths". Its 500 participants discussed ways to educate indigenous children in their own languages and based on their own values, seeking to preserve the identity of each ethnic group in this globalized age. The session also examined the need to establish legislation (including the declaration on indigenous rights), which shall serve as basis for reforming national legislation in the countries inhabited by these communities.
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Monday, January 18 2010
State of the World's Indigenous Peoples
(Source: UN Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues)
Friday, September 14 2007
United Nations adopted Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples
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Fifth Session of the Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues (United Nations)

Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues

Fourth session of the Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues (UN Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues)

Civil society statements

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Reports and documents

State of the World's Indigenous Peoples (UN Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues)


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